Known as “the City in the Country,” Coral Springs has become a premier South Florida community, known for its abundant parks, quality schools, numerous athletic programs, and attractive neighborhoods. Prior to its incorporation as a City in July 1963, the area that was to become Coral Springs was part of a huge tract of land acquired by Henry “Bud” Lyons between 1911 and 1939 that totaled over 20,000 acres of marshy wilderness in western Broward County.

Clearing and draining the land himself, with the help of workers from the Bahamas, most of the land was used to grow beans, earning him the nickname “Titan of the Bean Patch.” Lyons died in 1952, leaving his vast land holdings to his family, who converted the land to be used for ranching, bringing in 5,000 head of cattle. After a series of wet hurricanes had flooded much of the southern portions of the State in 1947, Florida created the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District (now the South Florida Water Management District) that built a network of canals and levees throughout South Florida. The canals helped to further drain the land that would become Coral Springs.